The British Journal of Psychiatry
The Quality of Survival after Rupture of an Anterior Cerebral Aneurysm
VALENTINE LOGUE, MARJORIE DURWARD, R. T. C. PRATT, MALCOLM PIERCY, W. L. B. NIXON

Abstract

Seventy-nine survivors of a ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysm were assessed at intervals ranging from six months to 8½ years after the haemorrhage. Fifty-two patients were neurologically unimpaired at follow-up, and 44 had returned to their previous work level. Sixty-six patients were treated by proximal occlusion of the anterior cerebral artery mainly responsible for feeding the aneurysm; this operation appeared to reduce the long-term mortality.

A principal components analysis extracted four independent components corresponding to intellectual impairment, elation/depression, affective release/flattening, and language impairment. In nine instances both patient and informant agreed that there had been a personality change for the better, of the type seen after a favourable leucotomy, although a price was usually paid for this in the form of a mild memory impairment.