The British Journal of Psychiatry

Abstract

Life histories and interview descriptions of 23 young men diagnosed as offizoid in middle childhood and adult life and of 20 control subjects not given this diagnosis were presented for diagnostic rating to two independent general psychiatrists. Agreement about the presence or absence of schizoid personality was good. It is concluded that, in the case of boys, the syndrome of schizoid personality in childhood (Asperger's syndrome) corresponds to or is subsumed by the more general clinical picture psychiatrists have of schizoid personality in adult life, and that our original use of this diagnostic label for the youngsters we described was not idiosyncratic.