The British Journal of Psychiatry
Pathways to care and ethnicity. 1: Sample characteristics and compulsory admission: Report from the ÆSOP study
Report from the ÆSOP study
CRAIG MORGAN, ROSEMARIE MALLETT, GERARD HUTCHINSON, HEMANT BAGALKOTE, KEVIN MORGAN, PAUL FEARON, PAOLA DAZZAN, JANE BOYDELL, KWAME McKENZIE, GLYNN HARRISON, ROBIN MURRAY, PETER JONES, TOM CRAIG, JULIAN LEFF

Abstract

Background Many studies have found high levels of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital in the UK among African–Caribbean and Black African patients with a psychotic illness.

Aims To establish whether African–Caribbean and Black African ethnicity is associated with compulsory admission in an epidemiological sample of patients with a first episode of psychosis drawn from two UK centres.

Method All patients with a firstepisode of psychosis who made contact with psychiatric services over a 2-year period and were living in defined areas were included in the (ÆSOP) study. For this analysis we included all White British, other White, African–Caribbean and Black African patients from the ÆSOP sampling frame. Clinical, socio-demographic and pathways to care data were collected frompatients, relatives and case notes.

Results African–Caribbean patients were significantly more likely to be compulsorily admitted than White British patients, as were Black African patients. African–Caribbean men were the most likely to be compulsorily admitted.

Conclusions These findings suggest that factors are operating at or prior to first presentation to increase the risk of compulsory admission among African–Caribbean and Black African patients.

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